© 2020  PANIC

Speakers and Bios

NIST-IBBR

Welcome to the SIERRA, Where Have All the Large Peaks Gone?

University of Georgia

The Structural Role of N-Glycosylation in interactions between Antibodies and Receptors

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Using DOSY Spectroscopy to Understand the Origins of Fuel Properties

University of Liverpool

Zeolites Heterogeneous Catalysts Caught in the Act by (DNP) MAS NMR

Merck and Co., Inc.

What can NMR analysis reveal about Acyl Glucuronides and their relative stability to inform on potential DILI risk?

Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

Analyzing zeolite catalysts at an atomic level by solid-state NMR

US Drug Enforcement Administration

Low Field qNMR of Methamphetamine HCl

Green Imaging Technologies

Reducing Sample Heating Employing A Variable Spaced Tau CPMG

Aston University

NMR Cryoporometry - Characterization of Porous Materials Using Liquid NMR

ABQMR Inc.

NMR of chemical reactions at elevated process conditions

Carnegie Mellon University

3D Structure Elucidation of Small Organic Molecules Using MultiNMR Parameters

3M

Implementation of a Benchtop NMR in a manufacturing Environment

Istituto di Ricerche Chimiche e Biochimiche G Ronzoni

Automated 2D quantitative NMR spectroscopy for complex drug analysis

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

In Situ (Operando) Magic Angle Spinning NMR for Harsh Experimental Conditions

Singapore University of Technology and Design

The Latest Progress of Low-field Permanent-Magnet-based MRI Head Imager

Phillips 66 Company

Elucidating Structural Characteristics of Renewable Products by NMR

Pfizer Inc

Residual Chemical Shift Anisotropy (RCSA) in Small Molecule Structure and Dynamics: the nuts and bolts

Please reload

Genentech, Inc.

Insights into Pharmaceutical Drug Products Using Multinuclear Solid-State NMR

Institut Lavoisier de Versailles (ILV)

A 3D-printed NMR insert to study porosity and gas diffusion in microporous order

University of Canterbury

Automated Quantification with Benchtop NMR

Korimako Chemical Limited

Online monitoring of enzymatic hydrolysis of marine by-products

University of Alberta

Solid-state NMR Strategies to Decode Porous Materials

BASF Advanced Materials and Systems Research

Looking deeply into a turbid crystal ball: TD-NMR on liquid polymer dispersions

Kansas Analytical Services, LLC

Opportunities and Challenges in 19F Detection of Fluorinated Pharmaceuticals

US FDA

Complementary Small Molecule Mass Spectrometry and NMR: Food Applications

KU Leuven - cMACS

Low-field NMR and MRI For In Operando NMR Studies.

Washington University

Molecular Basis of Secondary Relaxation in Stiff-Chain Glassy Polymers.

Bundeskriminalamt

Adhesive Tapes in Magic Angle - NMR's Superior Discrimination Power

Schlumberger-Doll Research

Pore connectivity by NMR-detected capillary pressure experiment

ExxonMobil Research & Engineering

Two-Dimensional NMR Applications for Structural Elucidation of Complex Petrochemical Mixtures

University of Maryland, Baltimore

1H2O NMR—From Solute Organization to Quality Control in Biomanufacturing

DSM

Enzyme kinetics determined by rapid real-time NMR

KIT

Low-field RheoNMR

University of North Carolina at Wilmington

3D Structure Elucidation of Small Organic Molecules Using Multi-NMR Parameters

Please reload

 
 
 
 
 
Speaker Bios

Luke Arbogast

NIST-IBBR

Rockville, MD, United States

Welcome to the SIERRA, Where Have All the Large Peaks Gone?

Luke is a NIST research chemist working on the development, validation and application of advanced multidimensional NMR methods for the structural characterization of protein therapeutics including monoclonal antibodies.

 

 

Adam Barb

University of Georgia

Athens, GA, United States

The Structural Role of N-Glycosylation in interactions between Antibodies and Receptors

Adam Barb, an associate professor at the University of Georgia. Dr. Barb earned B.S. and M.S. degrees in plant science before pursuing a Ph.D. at Duke University under Christian Raetz and Pei Zhou in the Department of Biochemistry. There, Dr. Barb combined in vitro enzyme kinetics measurements of an essential deacetylase in Gram-negative bacteria with solution NMR spectroscopy to probe the structure/function relationship of this important antibiotic target. He subsequently moved to the Complex Carbohydrate Research Center at the University of Georgia to work under James Prestegard and began studies on antibody glycosylation. Dr. Barb joined the Roy J. Carver Department of Biochemistry, Biophysics & Molecular Biology at Iowa State University in 2012 and was awarded the ASBMB Herb Tabor Award for studies on the structural role of antibody glycosylation in receptor interactions. The Barb Lab moved to the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Georgia in 2019.

Tim Bays

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Richland, WA, United States

Using DOSY Spectroscopy to Understand the Origins of Fuel Properties

Dr. Tim Bays joined PNNL in 2005 and is currently a researcher in the Applied Chemistry Team of the Chemical & Biological Processing Group. He conducts research in the area of renewable and fossil hydrocarbon fuels in support of the Department of Energy?s Vehicle Technologies Office and Bioenergy Technologies Office under the Co-Optimization of Fuels & Engines Program. Dr. Bays holds a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from the University of Idaho and a B.S. in chemistry from the U.S. Naval Academy. Prior to arriving at PNNL, he was an associate professor at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, New York. Prior to his career in chemistry, Dr. Bays served on active duty with the U.S. Navy from 1987-1992, and has since served as a drilling Navy Reservist, attaining the rank of Commander, retiring in 2013. During 2009-2010, Dr. Bays was mobilized by the Navy to Baghdad, Iraq, where he served as a liaison between the U.S. Embassy, the Commanding General and the Government of Iraq. Dr. Bays is a veteran of Operation Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom. He is the recipient of the Defense Meritorious Service Medal and a Department of State Meritorious Honor Award (2010) for service at the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, Iraq, and co-recipient of a 2012 R&D 100 Award.

 

 

Frédéric Blanc

University of Liverpool

Liverpool, United Kingdom

Zeolites Heterogeneous Catalysts Caught in the Act by (DNP) MAS NMR

After a PhD in Chemistry at the University of Lyon and the Centre for High Field NMR completed in 2008,  Frédéric Blanc moved to the State University of New York as a Lavoisier Fellow and then the University of Cambridge as a Marie Curie Fellow. He was appointed to a Lectureship (US equivalent to Assistant Professor) in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Liverpool in December 2012 and promoted to Reader (US equivalent to Professor) in October 2018. His research program is focused on applying solid-state NMR spectroscopy to tackle a wide range of challenges across materials chemistry. In particular, he has recently been interested in capturing transient catalytic intermediates in heterogeneous catalysis;  probing charge carrier mobilities in energy materials; and investigating host guest interactions in supramolecular assemblies. He has also been interested in exploiting the large sensitivity gain of solid state dynamic nuclear polarization to probe insensitive nuclei (for example, oxygen-17 at natural abundance or low-gamma nuclei). He serves as Co-Director of the 800 MHz Facility in Liverpool and is on Royal Society NMR discussion group committee. He coordinates the newly established Connect NMR UK network, promoting engagement with a large range of potential NMR users. Further details can be found in the group website at http://pcwww.liv.ac.uk/~fblanc/WebsiteLiverpool/Home.html  and Twitter at @DrFredericBlanc

 

Alexei Buevich

Merck and Co., Inc.

Kenilworth, NJ, United States

What can NMR analysis reveal about Acyl Glucuronides and their relative stability to inform on potential DILI risk?

Dr. Alexei Buevich holds a Ph.D. and a Master's Degrees in Physical Organic Chemistry (NMR) from the Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia. Prior to joining the Schering-Plough NMR Structural Chemistry group in 2001 he was a Senior Research Scientist at the Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences (1990-1994), a Post-Doctoral Fellow in BioNMR at Umea University, Sweden (1995-1997), and then a Research Associate at Rutgers University, NJ (1997-2001). He is currently a Principal Scientist at Merck in the NMR Structure Elucidation group, and his research interests include development and application of new experimental and computational methods for R&D problems in the pharmaceutical industry.

Bradley Chmelka

Univ. of California, Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara, CA, United States

Analyzing zeolite catalysts at an atomic level by solid-state NMR

Prof. Chmelka received his PhD in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1990 under the supervision of Prof. Clayton Radke and Prof. Eugene Petersen. Prior to graduate studies, he was a plant-startup engineer for two years with Unocal?s Oil Shale Operations in Colorado (U.S.), after receiving his Bachelors of Science degree in chemical engineering from Arizona State University. Following his PhD, he conducted post-doctoral research at the University of California-Berkeley with Prof. Alexander Pines in the Department of Chemistry and at the Max-Planck-Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany with Prof. Hans Spiess. Prof. Chmelka joined the Department of Chemical Engineering at UCSB in 1992 and is currently Distinguished Professor. He works broadly in the area of correlating and understanding the molecular and macroscopic properties of heterogeneous materials, with emphases on those for energy and environmental applications. He is a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (2015) and the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering (2017). His research has been recognized by the 2016 Braskem Award from the Materials Science and Engineering Division of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, a David and Lucile Packard Foundation Award, a Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Award. He serves on several industrial and academic advisory boards and holds an honorary doctorate from Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden. He has been an invited professor at universities in Sweden, France, Spain, Israel, and Switzerland. Since 2015, he has served as Co-Director of the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, a federally supported university affiliated research center involving research groups at UCSB, MIT, and Caltech. He has authored approximately 180 technical publications and has 10 issued patents.

 

 

Charlotte Corbett

US Drug Enforcement Administration

Dulles, VA, United States

Low Field qNMR of Methamphetamine HCl

Charlotte Corbett has worked as a forensic drug chemist for 17 years. She has specialized in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the past seven years. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration utilizes NMR for purity determination, structure differentiation, identification, and structure elucidation. DEA continues to simplify quantitation through automation.

Michael Dick

Green Imaging Technologies

Fredericton, NB, Canada

Reducing Sample Heating Employing A Variable Spaced Tau CPMG

Mike received his bachelor and masters degrees from the University of New Brunswick. Following this he received his PhD from the University of Waterloo. After graduation, Mike was a post-doctoral fellow at NASA?s Jet Propulsion Lab. Following this position, Mike worked for six years as a research scientist with Bubble Technology Industries (BTI) in Chalk River Ontario Canada. Mike joined Green Imaging Technologies in 2015 as a principal research. With GIT, Mike focuses on expanding the suite of measurements for core analysis via NMR.

 

 

Hilary Fabich

ABQMR Inc.

Albuquerque, NM, United States

NMR of chemical reactions at elevated process conditions

Hilary Fabich is a scientist at ABQMR Inc. She has been working with magnetic resonance (MR) for over ten years and, in addition to her current home at ABQMR, has worked with groups in Montana, Sweden, England and New Zealand. Her expertise is in imaging complex systems such as bubble formation in a model scale fluidized bed and, more recently, in using MR to study chemical reactions at process conditions of high temperature and high pressure. She has also studied fluid dynamics in supercritical flows and has been part of a project to build an MRI system to image plant roots in the field. She enjoys exploring unique applications of MR that require one of a kind hardware.

 

 

Robert Evans

Aston University

Birmingham, West Midlands, United Kingdom

NMR Cryoporometry - Characterization of Porous Materials Using Liquid NMR

Robert Evans is Senior Lecturer of Physical Chemistry at Aston University. He holds a MChem and PhD from the University of Oxford. He moved to Aston following postdoctoral work at Ecole Polytechnique, with Stefano Caldarelli, and the University of Manchester, first with Gareth Morris and Mathias Nilsson and then in the group of Nicola Tirelli. His research interests involve the use of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance in the analysis of polymers, soft materials and complex mixtures.

 

 

Roberto R. Gil

Carnegie Mellon University

Pittsburgh, PA, United States

3D Structure Elucidation of Small Organic Molecules Using MultiNMR Parameters

Roberto R. Gil was born in Catamarca, Argentina in 1961. He received the degrees of BS/MS in Organic Chemistry (1983) and Ph.D. in Natural Products Chemistry (1989) from the University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina. In 1992 he received an external post-doctoral fellowship from the National Research Council of Argentina (CONICET) to work with Professors Geoffrey A. Cordell and A. Douglas Kinghorn at the University of Illinois at Chicago in the field of bioactive natural products from plants. In 1995, he returned to the University of Córdoba where he started his own research group as Assistant Professor. He was later inducted to the CONICET research track. In 1995 received the award “Top Ten Youngsters of the Year” given by the Chamber of Commerce of Córdoba City and also the award “CATAMARCA 96” sponsored by the Government of the Province of Catamarca. In 2000 he spent a year as Visiting Professor at Carnegie Mellon University working in Protein NMR with Professor Miguel Llinás. In 2001 he returned to UNC for a brief period of time where he continued his teaching and research activities as Associate Professor and he was also appointed Associate Dean for Science and Technology Affairs of the UNC College of Chemistry. In 2002, he moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he currently holds the position of Research Professor and Director of the NMR Laboratory of the Department of Chemistry at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interest is aimed at the development and application of NMR methodologies to the analysis of small molecules in general. Since 2008 he has been strongly involved in the development of new methodologies for the structural analysis of small molecules using a combination of isotropic and anisotropic NMR parameters together with computational methods. He has developed together with Prof. Armando Navarro-Vazquez the unique computational method "Computer Assisted 3D Structure Elucidation" (CASE-3D). His research is supported by NSF. In 2012 he was the Program Chair of SMASH-NMR, the NMR conference for small molecules and he is currently permanent member of SMASH organizing committee. In 2012 he also edited a special supplementary issue for the journal Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry (MRC) on “NMR of Small Molecules in Anisotropic Media”. From November 2013 to August 2016 he served as Features Editor of MRC.  As of September 1st, 2016 he is Co-Editor in Chief of MRC. At Carnegie Mellon he is strongly involved in programs oriented to increase the representation of underrepresented groups in Science. He has been serving in the CMU President Diversity Advisory Council 2006-2014. He has over 100 presentations to meetings and is co-author in five chapters, one entry for the Encyclopedia of Spectroscopy and Spectrometry and 126 articles in peer-reviewed journals.

 

 

Travis Gregar

3M

Maplewood, MN, United States

Implementation of a Benchtop NMR in a manufacturing Environment

I have worked with 3M Corporate Research Analytical Laboratory specializing in NMR, competitive analysis, and complex problem solving for 19 years.

 

 

Marco Guerrini

Istituto di Ricerche Chimiche e Biochimiche G Ronzoni

Milan, Italy

Automated 2D quantitative NMR spectroscopy for complex drug analysis

I have amassed over 25 years of experience at the forefront of characterisation and structural studies of oligosaccharides, especially heparin and heparin derivatives, using NMR. Consequently, our laboratory is the primary point of reference for researchers and industrial concerns working in heparin field in the world. I?m the vice-director of the Institute, contributing to the coordination and the management of the scientific activities. I have also responsibility for running the NMR Centre at the Ronzoni Institute in Milan, including management of the staff organisation. Research highlights have included elucidation of the structural basis of the specificity of influenza viruses H1N1, in wild type and mutated forms, revealing hitherto unknown features, the identification of a contaminant of heparin production, uncovering details of interactions between heparin and important proteins including antithrombin and fibroblasts growth factors (FGF1 and 2). I have managed research projects, from a range of European and American funding sources My twenty-five years? experience in analysis and characterization of heparin and other glycosaminoglycans is proved by more than 100 peer reviewed articles published in primary journals. The main scientific activity at the Ronzoni Institute was devoted to the elucidation of relationships between structure, biological activity and applied properties of oligo- and polysaccharides. My group has given especially important contributions to the advancement of knowledge and to the development of new applications in the field of heparin and other glycosaminoglycans. Some of major contributions (mostly in collaboration with international groups) have been: i) implementation of a new NMR method to determine the mono- and disaccharide composition of heparin and low molecular weight heparins; ii) structural characterization of low-molecular weight heparins and heparin oligosaccharides; iii) determination of the conformation of heparin oligomers and assessment of their 3D structures in complexes with AT and growth factors, through molecular modelling and NMR spectroscopic studies. In 2008, together FDA and MIT, I?ve contributed to the identification of the heparin contaminant, and to the development of control methods to ensure heparin quality. Within this activity, in collaboration with Prof A.E. Yates of the University of Liverpool and Dr T.R. Rudd of NIBSC of London we developed new analytical tools to guarantee the safety of heparin drugs coupling NMR and chemometric techniques. The main object of the study was the creation of a library of heparin NMR spectra, both monodimensional (proton) and bidimensional (1H-13C heteronuclear correlation HSQC), constituted by accepted bona fides samples, according to the current criteria of the manufacturer, and representing the natural structural variability of heparin. More recently, in collaboration with Bruker Biospin, we developed tools in AssureNMR software for qualitative assessment, porcine verses bovine heparin, and quantitative analysis of heparins and impurities.

 

 

Jian Zhi Hu

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Richland, WA, United States

In Situ (Operando) Magic Angle Spinning NMR for Harsh Experimental Conditions

I received my Ph.D. degree in 1994 from a joint training program between the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan Institute of Physics and the Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, USA. Currently, I am a senior staff scientist, graduate and postdoctoral researcher advisor, in Pacific Northwest National laboratory located in Richland, Washington State. I have extensive research experience in solid-state NMR spectroscopy with more than 200 peer-reviewed publications, h-index of 42, about 6000 web of science citations, two R&D 100 awards, and 11 US Patents.

 

 

Shaoying Huang

Singapore University of Technology and Design

Singapore

The Latest Progress of Low-field Permanent-Magnet-based MRI Head Imager

Shaoying HUANG received the B.Eng., M. Eng., and Ph.D. degree from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore in 2003, 2006, and 2011, respectively. She joined the University of Hong Kong in 2010 working on computational electromagnetics (EM), and Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2012 working on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) related EM problems, both as a postdoctoral fellow. She has joined Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) as an assistant professor in the pillar of Engineering Product Development since 2014. She is an adjunct assistant professor in the department of surgery in National University of Singapore, Singapore. Her main research interests include, low-field MRI, non-linear MRI image reconstructions, and RF aspects of MRI. Moreover, she is also interested in wireless power transfer, wideband RF/microwave components, radiofrequency (RF)/microwave noninvasive/contactless sensing.

 

 

Jinfeng Lai

Phillips 66 Company

Bartlesville, OK, United States

Elucidating Structural Characteristics of Renewable Products by NMR

Jinfeng Lai is a Senior Scientist in the Research Center of the Phillips 66 Company. He received a Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from the University of California, Riverside in 2009. From 2011 to 2012 he was a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. In 2013, he joined the Research Center of Phillips 66 Company. His research interests include Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy as a probe of chemical structure and dynamics. He has published over 30 journal and proceeding papers. He is a reviewer for over 20 journals, including the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

 

 

Yizhou Liu

Pfizer Inc

Groton, CT, United States

Residual Chemical Shift Anisotropy (RCSA) in Small Molecule Structure and Dynamics: the nuts and bolts

Yizhou Liu received his BS in Physiology and Biophysics from Peking University, and his Ph.D. from the Biophysics program at the University of Virginia under the supervision of Prof John Bushweller. His graduate research was focused on structure and dynamics characterization of leukemogenic proteins with NMR and X-ray crystallography. After graduation he joined Prof James Prestegard?s group at the University of Georgia for postdoctoral training, working on NMR method development and structural determination of high-molecular weight membrane-associated proteins and their complexes. Later he joined Prof Dinshaw Patel?s group at Sloan Kettering Institute as a research associate, where he worked on structural biology involved in the STING pathway and DNA-repair using NMR and X-ray crystallography. In 2014 he joined the small molecule structural elucidation group at Merck in NJ, where his career switched from biomolecules to the fascinating world of small molecule structural chemistry. At Merck, he used NMR and EPR in conjunction with theoretical computational methods to support drug discovery, process development, and manufacture. He moved to the PSSM Analytical Research & Development at Pfizer in CT in 2018 where his small molecule journey continues. His current research interests include spectroscopic method development related to NMR and EPR and their applications in chemistry and biology.

 

 

Joe Lubach

Genentech, Inc.

South San Francisco, CA, United States

Insights into Pharmaceutical Drug Products Using Multinuclear Solid-State NMR

Joe Lubach is a Senior Scientist in the Small Molecule Pharmaceutical Sciences department at Genentech, Inc., where he has been since 2007. In his current role, he leads the Solid-State Chemistry group within the Pharmaceutics department, working on physical form screening and solid-state characterization of small molecule drug substances and drug products. His personal research interests center around expanding applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy across the pharmaceutical discovery and development landscape, and he has authored or co-authored forty peer-reviewed publications and three reference chapters stemming from his work. Joe holds a Ph.D. in Pharmaceutical Chemistry from the University of Kansas (2007), where he worked with Prof. Eric Munson.

 

 

Charlotte Martineau-Corcos

Institut Lavoisier de Versailles (ILV)

Versailles, France

A 3D-printed NMR insert to study porosity and gas diffusion in microporous order

Dr. Charlotte Martineau-Corcos has been Assistant Professor at the University of Versailles for 10 years. Her research expertise deals with the development and application of solid-state NMR methods for the study of a wide variety of crystalline materials, including porous solids, pharmaceutical compounds or inorganic compounds.

 

 

Yevgen Matviychuk

University of Canterbury

Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand

Automated Quantification with Benchtop NMR

Yevgen (Eugene) Matviychuk is a post-doctoral fellow at the Department of Chemical and Process Engineering at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. With the group of Dr. Daniel J. Holland, he focuses on developing novel statistical methods for improving quantification in NMR spectroscopy, including experiments on medium field benchtop instruments and reaction monitoring. Eugene obtained his PhD in Electrical Engineering from the University of Colorado Boulder in 2016 and his B.Sc. degree from the Donetsk National Technical University, Ukraine in 2007. His research interests include modern signal processing and machine learning, specifically with applications to high-dimensional data analysis.

 

 

Evan McCarney

Korimako Chemical Limited

Wellington, WLG, New Zealand

Online monitoring of enzymatic hydrolysis of marine by-products

Evan started working in magnetic resonance as a post-doctoral researcher at UC Santa Barbara developing fundamental dynamic nuclear polarization NMR hardware and methods. These key developments were the basis for more refined applications in medical imaging and studying the interactions of water with macromolecules. As senior applications engineer at Magritek Ltd, he developed the NMR Rock Core Analyzer. This was followed by implementing standard and advanced time-domain NMR methods for service laboratories and research institutions. He then transitioned to benchtop spectroscopy developing industrial applications for the Magritek Spinsolve with an emphasis on automation and quantitative NMR (qNMR) methods intended for industrial applications in pharmaceutical, neutraceutical, forensics, and petroleum. At Korimako Chemical Limited Evan continues to develop practical benchtop NMR methods with academic and industrial partners focusing on commercially viable solutions. He continues to draw on previous experiences from a diverse experience in NMR, choosing the promising methods from relaxation, diffusion, spectroscopy, or combinations to apply to new problems.

 

Vladimir Michaelis

University of Alberta

Edmonton, AB, Canada

Solid-state NMR Strategies to Decode Porous Materials

Assistant Professor at the University of Alberta; Postdoctoral Fellow at the Francis Bitter Magnetic Laboratory, MIT with R. Griffin studying dynamic nuclear polarization NMR. Studied quadrupolar nuclei with S. Kroeker (University of Manitoba) in crystalline and amorphous materials during his PhD studies.

 

 

Nikolaus Nestle

BASF Advanced Materials and Systems Research

Ludwigshafen, RLP, Germany

Looking deeply into a turbid crystal ball: TD-NMR on liquid polymer dispersions

Since 2006 BASF SE Advanced Materials and Systems Research; 2002-2006 non-tenured faculty position in condensed matter physics TU Darmstadt; 2002-2003 contract professor faculty of design and arts Free University of Bolzano; 2002 habilitation in physics University of Leipzig (advisor: J. Kärger); 1995 PhD in Physics University of Ulm (advisor: R. Kimmich)

 

 

Matthew Nethercott

Kansas Analytical Services, LLC

Wellington, CO, United States

Opportunities and Challenges in 19F Detection of Fluorinated Pharmaceuticals

Matt Nethercott joined Kansas Analytical Services, LLC in 2014 as a senior analyst after completing a postdoctoral position in the laboratory of Dr. Eric Munson from 2012 ? 2014 at the University of Kentucky. In his current role, he is responsible for acquiring, analyzing, and reporting to clients the solid-state NMR data for submitted samples. Matt obtained a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Michigan State University (2012), under the advisement of Dr. David Weliky. The work there focused on applying 2D 13C/13C solid-state NMR spectroscopy to obtain structural information on the HIV gp41 protein?s fusion peptide region.

 

 

Clark Ridge

US FDA

College Park, MD, United States

Complementary Small Molecule Mass Spectrometry and NMR: Food Applications

Clark Ridge is a researcher at the US FDA in the area of food and additive safety. He has been an analytical NMR spectroscopist there for eight years and in that time has worked on a great variety of food and food related projects including in part, food dyes, chemical contaminants, adulterated products, seafood toxins, and dietary supplements.

 

 

Dimitrios Sakellariou

KU Leuven - cMACS

Leuven, Belgium

Low-field NMR and MRI For In Operando NMR Studies

Born in Athens in 1974, he studied Chemistry at the University of Athens and graduated from the École Normale Supérieure de Lyon (ENS). His Master's degree was obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lyon on particle and nuclear Physics. He earned his PhD on Solid-State NMR in the Solid-State NMR Group of the ENS under the direction of Prof. L. Emsley. He was a post-doctoral fellow in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Materials Sciences Division) and University of California Berkeley, invited by Prof. A. Pines, where he developped methods and instruments for high-resolution magnetic resonance in the presence of inhomogeneous and rotating magnetic fields.

In 2004 he joined the Laboratory of Structure and Dynamics using Magnetic Resonance (LSDRM) of the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA in Saclay), as a tenured staff principal investigator. In 2008 he was awarded a Starting ERC grant for the project R-EvolutioN-M-R.

In 2017 he joined the Faculty of Bioscience Engineering of the Katholic University of Leuven, as a Professor in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. His research is performed at the Department of Microbial and Molecular Systems, in the Center for Membrane Separations, Adsorption, Catalysis and Spectroscopy for Sustainable Solutions (cMACS).

His current projects include: 1) New methods and instruments for improving magnetic resonance detection of ultra-small samples, 2) Portable sensors for industrial applications of magnetic resonance, 3) Hyphenated MR instrumentation, 4) Low-field magnetic resonance in metabolism and porous materials, 5) solid-state magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging.

 

 

Jacob Schaefer

Washington University

St. Louis, MO, United States

Molecular Basis of Secondary Relaxation in Stiff-Chain Glassy Polymers

Jacob Schaefer received his BS in chemistry from Carnegie Institute of Technology (Pittsburgh) in 1960, and his PhD in physical chemistry from the University of Minnesota (Minneapolis) in 1964. He joined Monsanto Company (St. Louis) as a research scientist in 1964 and worked on the determination of the microstructure of copolymers using solution-state 1H NMR. In 1969 he published the first 13C NMR spectra of synthetic copolymers, and in 1972, the first magic-angle spinning 13C NMR spectrum of a solid polymer. He joined the faculty of Washington University in 1986 as the Charles Allen Thomas Professor of Chemistry. His research specialty there has been high-resolution solid-state NMR. He is the co-inventor of cross-polarization magic-angle spinning (CPMAS, 1976) and rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR, 1989). Both techniques have become standard methods and are currently in use world wide. The Schaefer research program is making contributions to previously unsolved problems in biology and polymer science by performing solid-state NMR measurements on relevant, and often large and heterogeneous, materials that are not suited to diffraction or solution-state NMR measurements. He is the author of over 300 publications.

 

 

Torsten Schoenberger

Bundeskriminalamt

Wiesbaden, Hesse, Germany

Adhesive Tapes in Magic Angle - NMR's Superior Discrimination Power

Torsten Schoenberger is MSc in Analytical Chemistry. He is head of the NMR unit of the Forensic Science Institute, Federal Criminal Police Office (Bundeskriminalamt, BKA), Germany. His latest research fields are covering the quantitative NMR spectroscopy. In addition to quantification of all kinds of organic substances, one of his current main tasks is the structure elucidation of new psychoactive substances. This current work also covers the counterfeit detection of pharmaceuticals as well as the analysis of explosives and polymer based technical products.

 

 

Yiqiao Song

Schlumberger-Doll Research

Cambridge, MA, United States

Pore connectivity by NMR-detected capillary pressure experiment

Dr. Yiqiao Song is a Scientific Advisor at Schlumberger. He earned his BS from Peking University and Ph.D. from Northwestern University. He worked in UC Berkeley as a Miller Research Fellow before joining Schlumberger in 1997. He is also affiliated part-time at Massachusetts General Hospital. He is a Fellow of American Physical Society, an Editorial board member of Journal of Magnetic Resonance and Chinese Journal of Magnetic Resonance. Dr. Song has over 150 papers and over 50 patents.

 

 

Debra Sysyn

ExxonMobil Research & Engineering

Annandale, NJ, United States

Two-Dimensional NMR Applications for Structural Elucidation of Complex Petrochem

Debbie has a BS degree from The College of New Jersey and a MS from Lehigh University. She currently works in the Analytical Sciences Laboratory at ExxonMobil Research & Engineering Co. in Clinton NJ. Her primary job role and expertise is in NMR spectroscopy. Debbie has 25+ years experience in applying NMR techniques to a variety of petrochemical applications.

 

 

Marc Taraban

University of Maryland, Baltimore

Rockville, MD, United States

1H2O NMR–From Solute Organization to Quality Control in Biomanufacturing

Marc Taraban received a MS in physical chemistry from Novosibirsk State University and a PhD in chemical physics from the Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Chemical Kinetics & Combustion with specialization in spin chemistry. His research in the Laboratory of Magnetic Phenomena used methods of Chemically Induced Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (CIDNP) to observe intermediate species in fast radical reactions and magnetic field effects on enzymatic reactions. As a visiting assistant professor at the University of Utah, Taraban cont